ISEC International Support for Education and Communicationjapanese
   
 

Japanese education provides all children with a high quality, well-balanced education through 9 years of compulsory schooling (please refer to figure 1).

 

From April 2002, school days changed from six to five days in order to give students a more flexible schedule in their lives. Although high school education is not required, the retention rate of high school education is very high (please refer to figure 2).

            ( % )
  High school University and junior college
  Total Male Female Total Male Female
1950 42.5 48.5 36.7 - - -
1955 51.5 55.5 47.4 10.1 15.0 5.0
1960 57.7 59.6 55.9 10.3 14.9 5.5
1965 70.7 71.7 69.6 17.0 22.4 11.3
1970 82.1 81.6 82.7 23.6 29.2 17.7
1975 91.9 91.0 93.0 38.4 43.6 32.9
1980 94.2 93.1 95.4 37.4 41.3 33.3
1985 93.8 92.8 94.9 37.6 40.6 34.5
1990 94.4 93.2 95.6 36.3 35.2 37.4
1995 95.8 94.7 97.0 45.2 42.9 47.6
1996 95.9 94.8 97.1 46.2 44.2 48.3
1997 95.9 94.8 97.0 47.3 45.8 48.9
1998 95.9 94.8 97.0 48.2 47.1 49.4
1999 95.8 94.8 96.9 49.1 48.6 49.6
2000 95.9 95.0 96.8 49.1 49.4 48.7

 

Almost 90 percent of the students graduate from high school. The modern system of the formal education in Japan was inaugurated in 1872. In 1947, the Fundamental Law of education system (6-3-3-4) system was established on the basis of the principle of equal opportunity. Upper secondary schools started in 1948 with fulltime and part-time courses. In 1961, the correspondence course was added as a third type of upper secondary school course. Universities under a new system started in 1949. In the following year (1950), a provisional system of junior colleges started, and a permanent system of this type of college was established through an amendment to the School Education Law in 1964.

College of technology started in 1962 currently play a unique role in high education in Japan, providing specialized courses. Special education is provided for those who are physically or mentally handicapped, either in special schools for the blind, the deaf, and the otherwise handicapped or in special classes at ordinary elementary and lower secondary schools. In these schools or classes, the handicapped children are given special education adapted to their needs in accordance with the extent and degree of their disability. In addition, there are kindergartens for pre-school children as well as special training schools and miscellaneous schools both of which offer vocational, technical or other courses adapted to the needs of real life.